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20130117
20130125
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MSNBCW 13
MSNBC 6
WBAL (NBC) 2
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English 23
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
. not on trying to organize democrats behind it. >> you know, if they're coming out of the election, there was an enormous amount of energy coming out of the election. tens of thousands of people volunteered their own time to re-elect this president, and as i said before, not just to re-elect this president, but to move an agenda forward. tens of thousands of people organized all over the country, wanting to continue working for change across the country. of the -- everybody that is on the obama e-mail list, we did -- we asked some questions after the election. what do you want to do? how do you want to affect change? we're not done yet. they're not done yet. organizing for action will be a very effective tool. to organize people all over the country. for the president's agenda, to move us forward, whether it's gun control, to protect our children, whether it's climate change, whether it's immigration reform, whether it's to protect our economy and continue going forward for the middle class. these are things that people voteded for, and they want to keep working on them, and also t
that make this country great. >> i saw that as essentially sort of a bottom line on the election that got him to this day. >> yes. >> maybe a signal about what is to come in terms of the governing fights in washington. >> absolutely. it is quite likely that there will be some give and some compromise. but he is creating a bottom line here beyond which he will not go. and that is a very strong signal for these budget fights to come. but writ more broadly, i was thinking of martin luther king jr. and of equal rights and of the refrain that, you know, our job is not done, what he basically was saying is our journey is not complete, to use his words. >> our journey is not complete. those are the two repeated phrases. our journey is not complete, and you and i as citizens, you and i. >> exactly. this is an exclusive moment. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are recognized as equal under the law. he is talking about doma, the supreme court argument to come. he is surrounded by the supreme court right this. and he talked about stonewall. ta talking about stonewall in
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
bush, the elder took over. she was there in 1985, president reagan's re-election. she was there in 1981, the first reagan inaugural. that's andrea mitchell. if i end up doing these for as long as andrea mitchell has done these, i will be covering every inauguration from now until 2041, by which time i will be coming to you, presumably, as a ho hologram. so help me god. second inaugural, as opposed to a first inaugural when one president is leaving and another is starting, and we're covering a second inauguration, like we will be this year there's something different. governing is already under way. the president has started some things that he intends to finish in his second term. sort of a sense of continuity, well informed expectation about what kind of president this is going to be and where he is likely to go. when president obama was inaugurated. first time, there was none of that certainty and expectation, right? the country and all of us were caught up in the historical enormity of the fact that the united states of america was about to swear in our first african-american preside
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
to come out who are still elected representatives of the party. one, to say hey, let's have a real conversation here and not just hide behind the nra and its rhetoric of fear. >> michael, do you think there are any republicans that will vote for any of the proposals that were put on the table today. >> i do. and i'll tell you why. it's the numb befrs that you show in the first segment today, those poll numbers. that's where the rubber meets the road here. it's a turning point and one that the party better get in front of. >> at this point in time, the only voice the gop is really hearing are the crazy ones. so you might be right, michael, susan, any other republicans who are out there. but as the debate is being framed, we don't see any real republicans in leadership positions taking a moderate -- >> michael, i hope you're correct. >> the obama campaign apparatus is going to take on the nra. we'll ask if the president will hit the road to make his case directly to the american people. then find out how survivors are reacting to the president's plan. sandyhook's top educator gives a
confident from his re-election. some might use the word cocky, and that he has become more partisan and more hard nosed. would you agree with that sae assessment? >> and is it by necessity or choice? >> no, i think he's become -- he's practical. and if the other side is going to take a position that they're going to oppose you on every initiative, you have to seek national support. in a democracy, people push policy forward not the politicians and so that's a lesson that he has drawn from the first term. that said, as far as i can -- as i know, and as i know him, his door is always open to people who are willing to work together to solve problems and one hopes in the next four years there will be a spirit of cooperation. understand we're never going to agree on anything. that's why we have two parties. in order to move the country forward we have to move together. >> david axelrod, always good to see you. >> good to see you, savannah. >> i know you'll be watching. we will have more on the second inauguration, but first natalie morales has a check of the other top stories. good morning. >> go
was the campaign manager for the obama re-election campaign. his role as significant as anybody, perhaps, in helping to make this day a reality for those who supported the president over the course of the last year. messina will now be running that vast array of names, list of names and supporters that the president has been able to take advantage of as they try to use that lift to help pursue some of his initiatives including an effort to pursue gun control in the weeks and months ahead. matt? >> as we take a look here, we now know that this inauguration day is under way in earnest. vehicles departing from the white house where they'll have a quick coffee with the bipartisan leadership as well as the lead organizers on this day with senator schumer. as you said, no question this job changes a person. having been president now for four years. >> they talk about the change that some close advisers and friends have seen of president obama, in the article it talks about the man who wanted to change the nature of washington now actually warns job candidates that it's hard to get anything don
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)